Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Bitten by Kelley Armstrong

Elena is the only female werewolf.  She was not born but bitten. After years living with the pack, she leaves and starts life over again in Toronto.  She meets a man, Phillip, falls in love and moves him in her home. Life is good until Jeremy calls, "Come home", he says. Jeremy is the pack master in New York. Elena does not pick up the phone.  When she calls back later she gets no answer. She calls and calls and still gets no answer. Elena tells Phillip her cousins were in an accident and she needs to go to the US for a few days. She is very worried.  When she gets to Stonehaven, she finds out that a mutt - a non-Pack werewolf - is killing people in the area.  Elena is upset.  She thought it was something serious. Little does she know that it's about to become very serious!

I enjoyed this book.  It's the first book that Armstrong wrote and sometimes the reader can tell but I was caught up in the story pretty quick.  This book has been optioned and turned into a TV show that will air on Syfy on Monday, January 13th. Look at this.  I cannot wait to check out the man playing Clay, one of Elena's love interests.

Summary from the author's site:
Elena Michaels is the world’s only female werewolf. And she’s tired of it. Tired of a life spent hiding and protecting, a life where her most important job is hunting down rogue werewolves. Tired of a world that not only accepts the worst in her–her temper, her violence–but requires it. Worst of all, she realizes she’s growing content with that life, with being that person.
So she left the Pack and returned to Toronto where she’s trying to live as a human. When the Pack leader calls asking for her help fighting a sudden uprising, she only agrees because she owes him. Once this is over, she’ll be squared with the Pack and free to live life as a human. Which is what she wants. Really.

Excerpt:
Prologue

I have to.


I’ve been fighting it all night. I’m going to lose. My battle is as futile as a woman feeling the first pangs of labor and deciding it’s an inconvenient time to give birth. Nature wins out. It always does. 
It’s nearly two AM, too late for this foolishness and I need my sleep. Four nights spent cramming to meet a deadline have left me exhausted. It doesn’t matter. Patches of skin behind my knees and elbows have been tingling and now begin to burn. My heart beats so fast I have to gulp air. I clench my eyes shut, willing the sensations to stop but they don’t. 


Philip is sleeping beside me. He’s another reason why I can’t leave, sneaking out in the middle of the night again and returning with a torrent of lame excuses. He’s working late tomorrow. If I can just wait one more day. My temples begin to throb. The burning sensation in my skin spreads down my arms and legs. The rage forms a tight ball in my gut and threatens to explode.


I’ve got to get out of here—I don’t have a lot of time left. 


Philip doesn’t stir when I slip from the bed. There’s a pile of clothing tucked underneath my dresser so I won’t have to risk the squeaks and groans of opening drawers and closets. I pick up my keys, clasping my fist around them so they don’t jangle, ease open the door and creep into the hallway. 
Everything’s quiet. The lights seem dimmed, as if overpowered by the emptiness. When I push the elevator button, it creaks out a complaint at being disturbed at so ungodly an hour. The first floor and lobby are equally empty. People who can afford the rent this close to downtown Toronto are comfortably asleep right now.


My legs now itch as well as hurt and I curl my toes to see if the itching stops. It doesn’t. I look down at the car keys in my hand. It’s too late to drive to a safe place now—the itching has crystallized into a sharp burn. Keys in my pocket, I stride out onto the streets, looking for a quiet place to Change. As I walk, I monitor the sensation in my legs, tracing its passage to my arms and the back of my neck. Soon. Soon. When my scalp starts to tingle, I know I have walked as far as I can so I search for an alley. The first one I find has been claimed by two men squeezed together inside a tattered big-screen TV box but the next one is empty. I hurry to the end and undress quickly behind a barricade of trash bins, hide the clothes under an old newspaper. Then I start the Change.


My skin stretches. The sensation deepens and I try to block the pain. Pain. What a trivial word—agony is better. One doesn’t call the sensation of being flayed alive ‘painful’. I inhale deeply and focus my attention on the Change, dropping to the ground before I’m doubled over and forced down. It’s never easy—perhaps I’m still too human. In the struggle to keep my thoughts straight, I try to anticipate each phase and move my body into position—head down, arms and legs pulled in and held straight out at the joints, feet and hands flexed, and back arched. My leg muscles knot and convulse. I gasp and strain to relax. Sweat breaks out, pouring off me in streams, but the muscles finally relent and untwist themselves. Next comes the ten seconds of pure hell that used to make me swear I would rather die than endure this again. Then it’s over.


Changed.


I stretch and blink. When I look around, the world has mutated to an array of colors unknown to the human eye, blacks and browns and grays with subtle shadings that my brain still converts to blues and greens and reds. I lift my nose and inhale. I pick up scents of fresh asphalt and rotting tomatoes and window-pot mums and day-old sweat and a million other things, mixing together in an odor so overwhelming I cough and shake my head. As I turn, I catch distorted fragments of my reflection in a dented trash can. My eyes stare back at me. I curl my lips back and snarl at myself. White fangs flash in the metal.
I am a wolf, a hundred and thirty-pound wolf with pale blonde fur. The only part of me that remains are my eyes, sparking with a cold intelligence and a simmering ferocity that could never be mistaken for anything but human.


I look around, inhaling the scents of the city again. I’m nervous here. It’s too close, too confined, it reeks of human spoor. I must be careful. If I’m seen, I’ll be mistaken for a dog, a large mixed breed, perhaps a husky and yellow Labrador mix. But even a dog my size is cause for alarm when it’s running loose. I head for the back of the laneway and seek a path through the underbelly of the city.
My brain is dulled, disoriented not by my change of form but by the unnaturalness of my surroundings. I can’t get my bearings and the first alley I go down turns out to be the one I had encountered in human form, the one with the two men in the faded Sony box. One of them is awake now. He’s tugging the remnants of a filth-encrusted blanket between his fingers as if he can stretch it large enough to cover himself against the cold October night. He looks up and sees me and his eyes widen. He starts to shrink back, then stops himself. He says something. His voice is crooning, the musical, exaggerated tones people use with infants and animals. If I concentrated, I could make out the words, but there’s no point. I know what he’s saying, some variation of ‘nice doggy’, repeated over and over in a variety of inflections. His hands are outstretched, palms out to ward me off, the physical language contradicting the vocal. Stay back—nice doggy—stay back. And people wonder why animals don’t understand them. 


Read more here.

Pages: 372
Published: 2003

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