Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Castaway Cove by JoAnn Ross

Shelter Bay # 6
Annie was relatively new to Shelter Bay. She moved there from Washington D.C. after her marriage broke up.  Mac was in the Air Force working as a D.J. and got blown up and discharged. He went home to find that his wife wanted a divorce and left their 5 year old daughter Emma with and left. So he moved home with his dad to Shelter Bay.

He was the midnight to four D.J. at KBAY. One night a woman named Sandy called in. Mac was intrigued by her. A few days later he ran into Annie at his grandfather's room at the memory care facility. He had seen her a few days before and was not very nice. His grandfather Charlie wants him to date Annie. Annie also gets to him. It took him a little bit and realizes that Sandy and Annie are the same woman.  They seem to keep bumping into each other and he convinces her to date him.
Is this the relationship for a happily forever after?

From the author:
They’ve never met. But they’re destined for each other…

Single dad Mac Culhane has traveled to some of the world’s most dangerous war zones, but now he and his young daughter have settled in Shelter Bay, where he’s become the late-night DJ for the local radio station. The last thing he expects is to connect over the airwaves with a caller. . .

After a painful divorce, Annie Shepherd opened up a scrapbook store in town and started volunteering with local senior citizens. Although she loves her work, dreams of the family she longs for keep her up late, listening to Mac Culhane’s voice on the radio.

When Mac and Annie finally meet in person, the attraction between them is instantaneous. But Annie isn’t ready to lay her heart on the line, and neither is Mac. Fortunately, no one in Shelter Bay is about to let a perfect match escape the magic of true love
. . .


Excerpt:
"You realize we’ve probably just landed ourselves on the front page of the Shelter Bay Sentinel,” Annie said as they drove away from the farmhouse restaurant, back toward town. 

“You’re overestimating our importance,” Mac said.  “We’ll probably land somewhere between the notice of the Taste of Shelter Bay festival and the police report.

"Which last week consisted of a call about a suspicious car stopping at mailboxes, which turned out to be the mail carrier," she said.  "Another mailbox was vandalized when someone painted a yellow smiley face on it and a domestic disturbance reported by a neighbor next door to a home where the couple who lived there turned out to be engaging in 'vigorous sexual role play.'"

"Don't forget the pool of blood on the pier," he said.

"Which turned out to be spilled Pinot Noir."  She'd laughed when she'd read that one.  "So, the top crime on the Shelter Bay police report hit parade was two cars stopping on a Forest Service road outside of town, some teenage boys getting out, having a fist fight, then getting back into their cars and driving away.”

“The first rule of Fight Club is never talk about Fight Club.  And you don’t sound all that upset.”

Annie shrugged. “It was a little unsettling, since I'm not used to being in the spotlight.  But everyone was already speculating about us.  At least we’ve livened things up until the next excitement.”

“Someone’s bound to get drunk on the Fourth and do something stupid,” Mac said encouragingly. “That should take the heat off us.”

“I’m not sure.  Especially since the Mayor made that proclamation declaring Shelter Bay the ‘Romance Capital of the Oregon Coast’ and decided to add a matchmaking day as part of the Fourth of July weekend festival.”

“That’s a plus. There'll be lots of other couples to focus on so we won’t be stuck in the bull’s- eye.” 

Annie only wished they’d be so lucky, but doubted they would, especially once they showed up with Emma and Mac’s father.  Wouldn’t that get speculative tongues wagging?

“Though Sedona and her date didn’t exactly look as if they’re going to be part of those festivities,” he said as he turned onto Harborview, which ran along the bay.  Most of the commercial boats were out to sea, though more sailboats were skimming across the water, sails raised to catch the wind.   

“He’s some rich tech guy who was interviewing her for a start-up he’s doing,” she explained.  “A matrix match-up service that supposedly fixes you up with your perfect partner.  Like that’s going to work."

“You never know."  He opened the sunroof, then rolled down both front windows enough to let the fresh air in.  "Look at us.”

“We didn’t meet online.

“No.  But the situation was much the same.  We probably talked more honestly because wedidn’t know each other than if we had, at least that first night you called in.”

And wasn’t that what she’d been thinking herself?

“We did skip past all that early getting to know you stuff,” she said.  “Like favorite foods, music, top three fave movies —”

“That’s an easy one.  The Godfather Platoon.  And Die Hard.  Oh, and I’m adding a fourth.Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid.”

“Ah, the usual guns, guts, and glory.”  She wasn’t the least bit surprised.

“I am a guy.  We like that stuff.”  The hot-guy look he shot her spurred a bone melting desire that had her rethinking her moratorium on men.   “Your turn.”

“It’s hard to pick just three.  Or even four.  But I tend to lean more toward the classics. Breakfast at Tiffany’s.  When Harry Met Sally.  Dirty Dancing.”

“Nobody puts Baby in a corner,” he said, quoting the famous line from her third choice. 

“You’ve seen it?”  Unlike his other choices, it didn't have a single weapon in it.

“Since women usually end up choosing the video for movie nights, once you reach a certain age, odds are you’ve seen that one.” He made the right turn toward the iron drawbridge leading out of town.  “Swayze was always pretty much a guy’s guy, even when he was dancing, which made watching it not that much of a sacrifice.”

Annie was thinking that she wouldn’t mind if Midnight Mac put her in a corner.  Up against the wall, with her skirt hitched up, and her legs wrapped around his waist. . .

And she was totally losing her mind.


Read another excerpt here.


Pages: 380
Published: 2013

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